Achieving safety, security and sustainability

by FM Media
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The Greater Manchester Police divisional headquarters, located at the Central Park development in east Manchester in the UK, illustrates how it is possible to achieve safety, security and sustainability.

The Greater Manchester Police divisional headquarters, located at the Central Park development in east Manchester in the UK, illustrates how it is possible to achieve safety, security and sustainability. The facility has a total floor area exceeding 10,000 square metres and essentially consists of three separate buildings that share common walls, thus appearing as a single structure.
Norman Disney & Young (NDY), which was engaged as the building research establishment environmental assessment method (BREEAM) consultant for the project, found that because of the secure and resilient nature of the building, the design options available were limited in the ability to achieve some of the BREEAM requirements in certain areas.
The result is an atypical correctional facility. The building respects and enhances its surroundings from every direction, and in particular from the tram platform where the building tiers up in height forming an exciting composition of forms. The building provides the disparate functions of being both open and secure at the same time with great success, and addresses both the public and private aspects of the scheme.
Tim Spies, NDY Manchester manager, states that one of the first tasks that NDY undertook was an energy strategy for the facility. “This assessment identified a number of low and zero carbon (LZC) technologies, which, in conjunction with an efficient building design, would significantly improve the energy performance of the building. We proposed the use of geothermal heat recovery (boreholes), micro-CHP (combined heat and power) and a photovoltaic array to provide in excess of 10 percent of the building’s energy requirements. This not only enhanced the building’s BREEAM rating, but also reduced carbon emissions and energy costs for the end user,” he notes.
“We undertook thermal modelling of the development in accordance with the Part L using the TAS software,” Spies adds. “We used this model to develop our energy strategy and inform our low and zero carbon recommendations. These were subsequently included within the design.”
Other areas where improvements could be made to reduce the building’s impact that were identified by NDY included the provision of bicycle storage to encourage green transport, water saving measures such as rainwater recycling and controlled and low flow fittings, daylight controlled lighting systems and ecological features that encourage local wildlife to prosper.
“The building sets the benchmark for a sustainable, low carbon, highly secure and resilient police facility,” Spies concludes.

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