On-boarding makes all the difference

by FM Media
0 comment

How new staff are managed into a business – the on-boarding process – can be the difference between an ultimately successful hire and one that is destined to fail, warns Hays.

How new staff are managed into a business – the on-boarding process – can be the difference between an ultimately successful hire and one that is destined to fail, and chief executive officers need just as much help before starting a new appointment as junior staff, warns Hays.
Contrary to popular belief, on-boarding does not start on day one of a new job, according to Hays. The company notes that induction or orientation programs, which are designed to help new arrivals learn the ropes, effectively take over where on-boarding leaves off, and that on-boarding begins before the new employee has started working, from the moment that he or she is in the running for the job.
Hays notes that, at junior levels, best practice on-boarding typically includes sending new recruits company information ahead of joining, preparing a personalised workstation for the individual, introducing them to their colleagues and key stakeholders both formally and informally ahead of time, plus providing them with a peer-buddy. However, the company notes that this common sense and straightforward approach can be ignored higher up the recruitment ranks.
Many executive hires are given vital data before their first day, such as the names of key stakeholders, top line figures and detailed project information; however, some other essential elements of the company, including organisational culture, values and working processes, are sometimes overlooked in the on-boarding process, Hays states. Having an effective on-boarding process can go some way towards avoiding costly hire errors and can vastly improve the probability of a cultural fit, the recruitment specialist concludes.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More